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Post Info TOPIC: A Couple of Questions
JD

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RE: A Couple of Questions


You can only fill in the info the owner gives you. Before I begin an inventory, I advise my clients what information the software can support and it's up to them if they want to utilize those options. Most don't supply anything but a description of the item and others supply a lot of info for the expensive items. Don't fret over empty areas in the software. The inventory is only as specific as the owner wants it to be.



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JD Weiss, President
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Thanks JD - I think I'm trying too hard to fill in information in all the tabs - I'll focus more on taking photographs.

Frank



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JD

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The insurance companies have their own tables to determine the value/worth of an item and pay accordingly. The most you can do is include as many photo's as you can, or the owner wants. If they have it, include any information asked for in the software such as purchase price, date and store. Make sure to including a description of the item; manufacture, make, model, serial number, color, size, etc. Input whatever info fits the item and is available from the owner. Don't improvise. If no info is available, it's no big deal. At the very least, take a close up (full frame) photo of the item and a wide angle showing it in the room with other items in the report.

The purpose of our business is to take photographs for the owner to be able to prove they had possession of a specific item and it was in their home or business on the date the photos were taken.

As for the value of the item, it's up to the owner to assign a value, not you. Do NOT suggest a value unless you are a licensed, bonded and insured appraiser. If you suggest a value, you may be liable for it if the insurance company says it's worth less. If you can include the purchase price in the report, most owners find they are under-insured when they make allowances for depreciation.

For me, the best way to do an inventory is to start at the front door, turn left or right and follow the wall taking photo's of everything around the room and walls, then everything in the center of the room. Then go to the next room and do the same thing until the inventory is completed. I also download the photos from each room into it's own folder on a laptop computer when I finish that room. That way, I don't end up with photos from a different room in that rooms inventory. I also make notes on each item for the report as I take the photo.

Good luck with your business.



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JD Weiss, President
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Jeff,

Thanks for the input - it helps to know there are others out there trying to make this work.

Frank



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Recently, I inventoried my American Legion Post.  I included as much information as I could, such make / model numbers of tv and computer, make of fridge, stove, freezer, and a photo of the kitchen sink.  Had no purchase info, so could not include that.  My inventory consisted of abour 50 photo's and 1000 words.  The printed report was very blank, but, we now have a photo record of everything that is there.  Purchase info is not a necessity, because photo's show proof of item.  If all you can enter is photo and item description with make / model numbers for electronics, this is what the insurance adjuster will need to help with the claims process.  Receipts are an added bonus.

 

From whar I have found on the message board, as you do more inventories, your speed will increase.

I am new to this business, so my information is a summation of what I have found by reading everything I could on this message board.  I also found the link to the old board and read everything there also.  Hope this helps.



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Jeff V.
Palatka, FL

www.YourPersonalStuff.com


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Hi all,

I'm just getting started in the practice part of the road map - got everything up to this point completed. I'm trying a practice inventory on my own home but I can't seem to figure out what to include in the actual inventory. I took photgraphs of LR furniture one closeup and one wide angle and added to the inventory software - I'm a little stuck on what to include in the TABS - Purchase, Appraisal, Warranty. If I (or my clients) want to include receipts, warranty information and any appraisal info then it will certainly take longer to include all this. I completed one room (LR) and without any additional information the report comes up looking kind of sparse (like there's not enough documentation).

I'm guessing it's all about what each client wants to include in their inventory but does it make a difference with the Insurance companies if there's no further documentation other than photographs? I'm not sure if this makes any sense but I just can't seem to move on with this - it started when we began looking for old receipts and proof of purchase on some of the more expensive furniture, entertainment systems, jewlery and collectables we have. I just got bogged down and started losing focus on what I was supposed to be doing, any guidance would be appreciated. Thanks

Frank

 

 



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Thanks, JD,  that helps a lot.



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JD

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I take photographs of everything. A close-up of the item and a wide angle showing it in the room with other items in the inventory works very well for most items including rugs, flooring and drapery. Utensils, linen, towels, etc. are fairly easy. Most people keep the utensils in the top drawer. Ask the owner to open the drawer and set out one of each on the counter above the open drawer. Take a photo that shows the single items on the counter and the items in the open drawer at the same time, then list the name and number of each on the inventory. Towels and linens are very easy. Take an overall photo of them on the shelf, list a count and description. The same with clothing and shoes. Take an overall photo of the closet and only take single photos of one-of-a-kind, or expensive items and list a description and count.

It isn't necessary to take photos of windows and doors unless they are special like triple pane, etc. I do however take wide angle photos of the carpet, floors, walls, celing lights/fans, windows and doors showing other items in the room because it makes a complete inventory and there is a place for them in the software. Is it more work? Yes it is, but the owner will thank you if they have an incident and need the insurance company to replace them. Your photographs are documentary evidence of their existence, type and condition. I take close-up photos of jewelry and artwork, especially originals or expensive items. If they have costume jewelry (inexpensive), an overall photo works. However, the owner makes that determination. Not you.

Of course, the above is mute if the owner wants photos of every item. We photograph what our clients want. If they want every little item photographed, it adds time to the inventory and when you go over the allotted time, you charge by the hour, with an hour minimum. On normal inventories I allot one hour per bedroom and charge by the number of bedrooms (and bedroom size rooms like home offices, etc.) for the complete inventory. If they want every single item photographed, I charge by the hour.

I hope this answers your questions.



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JD Weiss, President
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Thanks, Taylor.



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Our company does not photograph every little thing. We take pictures of the room that include the rugs. I dont think its nessasarry to photograph everything unless its value.

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How do you handle things like linens, towels, bedding, clothes, coats, shoes, kitchen utensils, window treatments, area rugs, paintings, posters, etc?  

 

Are there items that are considered part of the constructed house and not someone's "belongs" (i.e., garage door and opener, windows and sliding glass doors, etc)?

 

Thanks for your input.

Jack 



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